Billion Dollar Brain

The classic thriller of a lethal computer age and a maniac s private cold war General Midwinter loves his country, and hates communism In a bid to destabilize the Soviet power bloc he is running his own intelligence agency, whose brain is the world s biggest supercomputer With his past coming back to haunt him, the unnamed agent of The Ipcress File is sent to Finland tThe classic thriller of a lethal computer age and a maniac s private cold war General Midwinter loves his country, and hates communism In a bid to destabilize the Soviet power bloc he is running his own intelligence agency, whose brain is the world s biggest supercomputer With his past coming back to haunt him, the unnamed agent of The Ipcress File is sent to Finland to penetrate Midwinter s spy cell But then a deadly virus is stolen, and our hero must stop it from falling into the hands of both the Russians and the billionaire madman.
Billion Dollar Brain The classic thriller of a lethal computer age and a maniac s private cold war General Midwinter loves his country and hates communism In a bid to destabilize the Soviet power bloc he is running his o

  • Title: Billion Dollar Brain
  • Author: Len Deighton
  • ISBN: 9780425073728
  • Page: 421
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Billion Dollar Brain”

    1. The technological innovation in the supercomputer which puts it a quantum jump ahead of all the competition is that it uses base 10 arithmetic rather than binary. Yeah, right.

    2. I have now finished the fourth and last “Harry Palmer” novel from Len Deighton, namely: Billion Dollar Brain. I reiterate that Harry Palmer is the name given to the character by the filmmakers of the three Michael Caine movies, though “Harry” goes under the working name of Liam Dempsey in this novel.Like all the Deighton Palmer novels, The Billion-Dollar Brain is, to quote, , “intricate, with many dead ends.” The British WOOC(P) spy agency sends Palmer to Helsinki to investigate an A [...]

    3. A really good spy novel. A little bit airy and light and certainly quite funny. However its not a comedy, there are some pretty absurd characters but i have a feeling they're probably more realistic than we would want them to be ;) .Most of the humour comes from sardonic and cynical main character. Although there are some action scenes its mostly more realistic and low key than something like Bond.Perhaps a little convenient at times but not too much and i wasn't too confused about what was happ [...]

    4. This book isn't perfect. But it's my favourite of the Deightons. Maybe it's almost-perfect. I have the 1960s Penguin paperback which must've been a tie-in with the movie. And it's one of my prized possessions though as a valuable asset its worth is possibly $0.50. Great writing, because Deighton got into his stride in terms of elliptical style and a way of conveying more with less description. The scenes of the narrator with Signe the possibly-teenaged hired assassin are very funny. And though i [...]

    5. really enjoyed this book I think the backdrop of cold war paranoia appealed to me as I remembered much of that when growing up in the seventies and eighties and how it fed into popular culture in the form of Bond movies and Frankie goes to Hollywood videos to name but two!!This is a well-written book and is darker than some spy treatments of the time,there are twists aplenty yet the plot never becomes muddled in itself's a book in some ways low in sensation but high in espionage plotting and it [...]

    6. The fourth Secret File novel from Deighton, in which the unnamed hero (a.k.a. Harry Palmer) is instructed to investigate and infiltrate a private intelligence organization run by an American anti-Commie billionaire whose agents receive assignments via a massive supercomputer. Also, one such agent – who also happens to be an old friend of Palmer’s – may also be stealing viruses from the British govt, and not necessarily to give to his boss. The computer angle is obviously dated, but I liked [...]

    7. The fourth of Deighton's "unnamed spy" novels, this is a far more subtle story than the sub-Bondian antics of the film adaptation.Tasked with infiltrating the private espionage network of General Midwinter (creator of the eponymous Billion Dollar Brain), our protagonist falls in with Harvey Newbegin, one of Midwinter's men in a tale of cross and double-cross involving stolen viruses. The story moves from London to Helsinki, Leningrad, New York, San Antonio and back again. The erstwhile Colonel S [...]

    8. A fantastic Cold War spy thriller. Better than some of Deighton's earlier "unnamed spy" books; clearer in its descriptions, tidier with its characterizations. Deighton writes with fantastic economy of style, glazing over passages of time or periods of transit with a few quick sentences to get to the good stuff: the intrigue, the girls, the danger, the high stakes, the world-weary cynicism.

    9. ebook library (a story reminded)Story set way back in late 50's to the start of the 60's as book published 1962 yet very insightful to the role of human nature, politics, idealogies, capitalism versus communism and the religious fervor of following ideals as portayed by private army owner and leader Midwinter. I would guess the stupidity highlighted relates to from wikipeadia:" McCarthyism is the practice of making accusations of subversion or treason without proper regard for evidence.[1] The t [...]

    10. Horrifically far-fetched. By far the worst Deighton I’ve read to date. More Forbes than Le Carre - hopefully this was a blip.

    11. "Ο εγκέφαλος", εκδόσεις ΒΙΠΕΡ.Δεύτερο βιβλίο του Λεν Ντέιτον που διαβάζω, μετά το πολύ καλό Αποστολή: Βερολίνο (Death In Funeral) που διάβασα πέρσι. Μου φάνηκε ελάχιστα κατώτερο του προηγούμενου βιβλίου, αλλά και πάλι μιλάμε για ένα κλασικό ψυχροπολεμικό κατασκοπευτικό μυθιστόρημα [...]

    12. Originally published on my blog here in January 2004.The fourth Harry Palmer novel (in which he is still an unnamed narrator; the name was given him for the films) is the most dated of all of them. It relies on a plot device straight from James Bond or even The Man From UNCLE - the network of agents run by a computer. The novel begins with a Finnish journalist making waves when he starts investigating what he thinks is a massive British Secret Service operation in Finland - but there isn't one, [...]

    13. I loved what Ken Russell did with this Book. The Film is such a weird mixture of Fantasy and the kind of megalomania that has now become commonplace due to the advances in the very rudimentary computers that feature in the film itself that I am finding the book far more difficult to read. What I love about Deighton's style of writing is that it is so well researched and refined that I find a lot of modern Novel Writing very boring and film script like in approach. I like to be able to climb into [...]

    14. Not my favourite of the four unnamed agent books, but still a very good read. The film was spoilt by being over the top in parts, but beautifully filmed in others!This was one of the books that Deighton introduced an error, intentional I assume, concerning drinks.The characters Newbegin, Signe and the unnamed agent, start off with a whisky in chapter 3.One page on Newbegin finishes his vodka with no mention inbetween, of a change.Another book describes two characters drinking Dutch gin, they fin [...]

    15. A good technophobic exploration into the inadequacies of computer technology in the fraught conditions of the secret service and KGB. The inability of computers to improvise was made clear by this valuable text. It missed a higher rating only marginally. The descriptive elements of this book are beautifully crafted, and it is apparent that his career in food writing is influential.

    16. A plot is afoot to distribute a plague virus throughout the world. In play are a civilian "anti-terrorist" group, and intelligence groups from both England and the United States as well as Russia. A wonderful 1960s thriller.

    17. An interesting Cold War thriller. It is not action packed but has a story that links together as the book progresses and gives you a good insight as to how the spy game was carried out between the UK and USSR.

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